An Introduction to Theravada Buddhism

Learn about the Dhamma of the Theravada and the Thai Forest Tradition.


English

Overview: Introduction | Theravada | Thai Forest Tradition

History: Forest Sangha

Suttas: Access to Insight | SuttaCentral | Dhammapada

Videos: Sirimangalo | Buddhist Society of Western Australia | Short Dhamma Talks

Forums: Dhamma Wheel | Dhammaloka | Reddit

Blogs: dhamma musings | Sujato’s Blog

Directory: Sadhu!

Spanish

Bosque Theravada
Tradición tailandesa del bosque

French

dhammadāna (English)
Moines de la forêt

Russian

Будда.by

Other Languages

http://www.dhamma.ru/sadhu/62-non-english


Setting the Wheel of Dhamma in Motion

"There are these two extremes that are not to be indulged in by one who has gone forth. Which two? That which is devoted to sensual pleasure with reference to sensual objects: base, vulgar, common, ignoble, unprofitable; and that which is devoted to self-affliction: painful, ignoble, unprofitable. Avoiding both of these extremes, the middle way realized by the Tathagata — producing vision, producing knowledge — leads to calm, to direct knowledge, to self-awakening, to Unbinding.

"And what is the middle way realized by the Tathagata that — producing vision, producing knowledge — leads to calm, to direct knowledge, to self-awakening, to Unbinding? Precisely this Noble Eightfold Path: right view, right resolve, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration. This is the middle way realized by the Tathagata that — producing vision, producing knowledge — leads to calm, to direct knowledge, to self-awakening, to Unbinding.

"Now this, monks, is the noble truth of stress: Birth is stressful, aging is stressful, death is stressful; sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair are stressful; association with the unbeloved is stressful, separation from the loved is stressful, not getting what is wanted is stressful. In short, the five clinging-aggregates are stressful.

"And this, monks, is the noble truth of the origination of stress: the craving that makes for further becoming — accompanied by passion & delight, relishing now here & now there — i.e., craving for sensual pleasure, craving for becoming, craving for non-becoming.

"And this, monks, is the noble truth of the cessation of stress: the remainderless fading & cessation, renunciation, relinquishment, release, & letting go of that very craving.

"And this, monks, is the noble truth of the way of practice leading to the cessation of stress: precisely this Noble Eightfold Path — right view, right resolve, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration.

SN 56.11


Suttas to read

The Fruits of the Contemplative Life
To the Plowing Bharadvaja
The Reserve Fund
Quickly

Books to read

How to Meditate by Yuttadhammo Bhikkhu
The Four Noble Truths by Ajahn Sumedho
Lessons in Practical Buddhism by Yuttadhammo Bhikkhu
The Collected Teachings of Ajahn Chah

More books at Forest Sangha.


Remember the precepts—easy version!

  1. No killing.
  2. No stealing.
  3. Nothing sexual.
  4. No incorrect speech.
  5. No intoxicants.
  6. No eating after noon.
  7. No entertainment or beautification.
  8. No indulgence in sleep.

More virtue (sīla)


"As for proclaiming the Dhamma, you don’t have to do very much. Some of the Buddha’s disciples, like Venerable Assaji, hardly spoke. They went on almsround in a calm and peaceful manner, walking neither quickly nor slowly, dressed in sober-coloured robes. Whether walking, moving, going forwards or back they were measured and composed. One morning, while Ven. Sāriputta was still the disciple of a brahmin teacher called Sanjaya, he caught sight of Venerable Assaji and was inspired by his demeanour. He approached him and requested some teaching. He asked who Venerable Assaji’s teacher was and received the answer:

‘The Revered Gotama.’

‘What does he teach that enables you to practise like this?’

‘He doesn’t teach so much. He simply says that all dhammas arise from causes. If they are to cease their causes must cease first.’

Just that much. That was enough. He understood. That was all it took for Venerable Sāriputta to realize the Dhamma."

—Ajahn Chah, "Toilets on the Path"

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